Wednesday, 16 January 2019

Vitary - Carolyn Magallanes


Carolyn Magallanes

Carol, my love.

Carol is the sunshine that lights up my days. She’ll surprise you with a homemade spring roll or a steaming hot mocha and make you feel all warm and fuzzy inside.

She’s always willing to beta test my homemade edibles (bless her heart) and she’s just really nice to look at. She has this beautiful, cascading dark hair and the cutest little butt.

She’s works harder than almost anybody and is always willing to pick up the slack when necessary. She’s cleaned up other people’s messes more than a few times (both literally and figuratively).

Spending 8.5 hours a day in a dark clinic (seriously, when are we getting those lights fixed) becomes a lot less hateful when I see Carol’s bright, shining face (or smell her friggin’ deadly spring rolls).

She's my unicorn angel princess. Always.



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late 14c., "death," from Middle French obit or directly from Latin obitus "death," noun use of past participle of obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."


While recently watching Rex Murphy’s tribute to my late father, I was saddened that my father wasn’t able to hear Murphy’s wonderful words.  I’ve decided to write pieces that are dedicated to telling the people in my life how great I think they are.  I call them “Vituaries.” 

Tuesday, 15 January 2019

Vituary - Fatma Jiwa

Fatma Jiwa

Fatma Jiwa is one of a kind. I know that sounds cliché. I don’t care.

She’ll tell you the kind of day she’s having – millions of e-mails, looming deadlines, no lunch break – and you’d swear she’s describing her last vacation. Fatma doesn’t let the world get her down. I wish I were like that.

You can bet your life savings on the fact that Fatma will have a smile on her face each time you see her. Her infectious laugh drifts through the clinic, seemingly lightening the mood of even the most cantankerous.

Fatma’s unwavering optimism keeps me going each day. She is a walking billboard for the adage that we are each responsible for our own happiness. She doesn’t allow life’s curveballs to break her spirit, and I love her for that.

As I’ve said, Fatma is one of a kind.  



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late 14c., "death," from Middle French obit or directly from Latin obitus "death," noun use of past participle of obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."


While recently watching Rex Murphy’s tribute to my late father, I was saddened that my father wasn’t able to hear Murphy’s wonderful words.  I’ve decided to write pieces that are dedicated to telling the people in my life how great I think they are.  I call them “Vituaries.” 

Wednesday, 8 August 2018

Vituary - Nicole Giles

Nicole Giles
Talk about an angel!

This woman has a voice like Etta James, a heart like Fred Rogers, and a palette like Gordon Ramsay.

She takes the lemons that life throws at her with a grain of salt (and a splash of tequila) 'cause she's all about living her best life, which I so admire.

Nicole has the most beautiful family (who get to bask in her homemade pastas and chocolate cakes) and it's clear how hard she works to ensure her munchkins have the greatest life.

She's got a fabulous sense of humour and knows not to take herself too seriously, but she gives a shit when and where it counts

Nicole enriches the lives of everyone she meets and I consider myself quite lucky to know somebody as incredible as her.



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late 14c., "death," from Middle French obit or directly from Latin obitus "death," noun use of past participle of obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."


While recently watching Rex Murphy’s tribute to my late father, I was saddened that my father wasn’t able to hear Murphy’s wonderful words.  I’ve decided to write pieces that are dedicated to telling the people in my life how great I think they are.  I call them “Vituaries.”  

Friday, 3 August 2018

Vituary - Alyssia Bell-Surette

Alyssia Bell-Surette

Ah, my beautiful little unicorn princess #blessed

Alyssia is, without question, one of the funniest, sweetest, and most entertaining people out there. Not only does she put up with my dumb jokes, she actually cares enough to pretend she thinks they're funny!

She is much more intelligent, beautiful, and valuable than she thinks, and she has a lot in common with me so, naturally she's pretty spectacular.

She's a fellow r/crimescene enthusiast, a hot sauce fanatic (sexy), and my partner in anxiety. She's one of the only reasons I survive Mondays. and Tuesdays. And every other day.

Alyssia has the best laugh and the best sense of humour. Also, she has really nice hair.

Not only does she let me give her advice, she appreciates it. And I love her for that.

Alyssia never gives herself enough credit, but I hope one day she'll see what we all see. 





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late 14c., "death," from Middle French obit or directly from Latin obitus "death," noun use of past participle of obire "to die," literally "to go toward" (see obituary). In modern usage (since 1874) it is usually a clipped form of obituary, though it had the same meaning of "published death notice" 15c.-17c.
plural vitae, Latin, literally "life," from PIE root *gwei- "to live."


While recently watching Rex Murphy’s tribute to my late father, I was saddened that my father wasn’t able to hear Murphy’s wonderful words.  I’ve decided to write pieces that are dedicated to telling the people in my life how great I think they are.  I call them “Vituaries.”